Dakota Jackson Self-Winding Coffee Table (1978)

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Dakota Jackson Self-Winding Coffee Table (1978)

8,450.00

Iconic postmodern design by Dakota Jackson. The steel base features three levels of thick glass. Referencing the self-winding clock, the two “hands” of the table shift under and around the round top like the hands of the clock that hover ever so slightly apart from the clock’s face.  

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Dimensions

48ʺW × 48ʺD × 17ʺH


This work is often described as “semi-functional,” which is not exactly what it sounds like. This table is fully functional as a coffee table, and, yes, it can take a number of shapes depending on the placement of its “hands” ... but it also looks like it is supposed to do something more than what it actually can do. In other words, Jackson is poking holes in the the haughty Modernist tenet that ‘form follows function.’ He shows us that something can look functional, have the functional aesthetic, and not necessarily function in the way that the aesthetic indicates. There is no “minimal” essential form that any essential function dictates. So to put postmodernism in a nutshell: one can sit on a chair and use a barstool as a table. One can sit on a barstool and use the chair as an ottoman. What makes the chair a “chair” and the stool a “stool” is not essential to what they are... The chair is a chair because it looks like a chair “should” and then we use it based on what we believe it to be. Of course what is so profound about postmodernism is not that the table might look like a clock or look industrial and glamorous at the same time, it is that design, literature, art, etc. can wake us up, inspire us to reconsider and perhaps set aside even for a glorious second all of the notions, identities, labels, memories, ideologies to which we cling and to experience the sweetness of the moment, the endless possibilities of now. Don’t miss this treasure! 

PS - Very few examples of this design were made in anything other than brass tone. The chrome version seen here is quite rare. It’s a delight to behold because it also serves as a mirror, reflecting light and images so wonderfully. The third (and rarest) of all versions is the black aluminum version, which I have only seen once. less

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